Posts Tagged ‘lobbyist’

Federal Lobbying Disclosure Due

Friday, January 18th, 2013 by Geoffrey Lyons

LOBBYBLOG REMINDS YOU that two disclosure deadlines are approaching:

January 20 – LD-2
The once semi-annual, now quarterly report of lobbying income/expenditures is due for the fourth quarter of the LD-2 reporting calendar (see below). “Each registrant must file a quarterly report on Form LD-2 no later than 20 days (or on the first business day after such 20th day if the 20th day is not a business day) after the end of the quarterly period beginning on the first day of January, April, July and October of each year in which a registrant is registered.” (House Office of the Clerk). January 20th is in fact a Sunday, and the following Monday is a holiday, so make sure to get your LD-2 forms ready by Tuesday the 22nd.

Reporting Period    Filing Date
Jan 1 – March 31 April 20
April 1 – June 30 July 20
July 1 – Sept 30 Oct 20
Oct 1 – Dec 31 Jan 20

January 30 – LD-203
The semi-annual report is required of all lobbyists to certify ethics compliance and disclosure. “Form LD-203 is required to be filed semiannually by July 30th and January 30th (or next business day should either of those days fall on a weekend or holiday) covering the first and second calendar halves of the year. Registrants and active lobbyists (who are not terminated for all clients) must file separate reports which detail FECA contributions, honorary contributions, presidential library contributions, and payments for event costs.”  January 30th is a Wednesday.

For quick guidance on disclosure, visit lobbyingdisclosure.house.gov.  For a more substantive reference guide, consider The Lobbying Compliance Handbook

Two New Resources for Lobbyists

Tuesday, January 15th, 2013 by Geoffrey Lyons

The State Lobbying Compliance Handbook is available fore pre-order here.  The 113th Congressional Freshmen Report can be ordered as a full report or with select member profiles here.   

THIS BLOG HAS  no objection to self-promotion. But even if it did it would strain to suppress the announcement of Lobbyists.info’s two latest publications, The State Lobbying Compliance Handbook and The 113th Congressional Freshmen Report, both of which cast fresh light on areas hitherto very dim.

Take state lobbying. Until now, there have only been feeble attempts to conglomerate the disparate and contradictory elements of state lobby law. Yet the appetite for such a project has grown in recent years. Post-recession stimulus provoked a clamoring for clout in state legislatures and governors’ offices. Washington gridlock has driven many to look elsewhere.  State and local government affairs operations have sprung up to compete with their federal counterparts. Natural as these actions were, they each brought headaches – nobody knew what they were doing. There was no authority to declare that principals must register in California whereas across the border in Oregon and Nevada no such requirement exists. There was no treasury of paperwork from which lobbyists and practitioners could access any form requisite to compliance. There simply was no escape from the cumbersome research required to get things moving.

The State Lobbying Compliance Handbook, published by Columbia Books in collaboration with Holtzman Vogel Josefiak PLLC, is a deliverance from these woes. Due in March (and available for pre-order here), the book offers as its main feature concise summaries of each state’s lobbying regulations with up-to-date forms ready for submission. In just a few hundred pages, it slashes the countless opportunity costs that would otherwise be squandered on research, and extinguishes the potential risk of noncompliance.

Though very different, The 113th Congressional Freshmen Report has a similar function. Like the state handbook, it brings understanding where understanding is both anxiously wanted and hopelessly lacking. The freshman class of the 113th Congress is, to a large extent, unknown. Its members have no congressional track record, and many haven’t uttered a breath on policy positions important to lobbyists. Most significantly, this unfamiliar cohort comprises over a sixth of Congress.

Dr. Gary Feld, founder of PowerBase Associates, assigned his research staff the task of discovering more about these newcomers. After combing through thousands of media sources, filtering the results, and fitting them into a readable guide, the report was born.  Now being published by Columbia Books, its use will hopefully make the new Congress less of an enigma.

Lobbying at a Glance

Thursday, December 27th, 2012 by Geoffrey Lyons

FORMER SENATOR Bob Bennet (R-Utah) will return to Washington as a lobbyist, ending what he calls a “let's-punish-politicians-for-being-politicians” cool-off period.  The Examiner’s Tim Carney shared a few words on Bennet's appeal to the first amendment for the right to lobby.

Georgia will begin 2013 with a $100 gift cap.

The Maryland Ethics Commission released its list of top-paid lobbyists.

A petition to deport CNN's Piers Morgan “for attacking [the] 2nd amendment,” made the White House petition page, and has since (as of this posting) garnered over 82,000 signatures.  A less successful counter-petition aims to keep Morgan in the U.S., partly “to see how loads of angry Americans react.”

Congressman elect Joe Kennedy III (D-Mass.) has become a “how to get your ex back

184800091.html”>Congressional Friend” of the Irish National Caucus.  His soon-to-be predecessor, outgoing Online Pokies Congressman Barney Frank, has been sitting for numerous exit interviews.  In this one, Frank is asked “what grade do you give yourself? 1-10?”  His reply: “I give myself a 10 for being smart enough not to answer that question.”

According to The Atlantic, lobbyists should expect incoming Senator Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii), who is replacing the late Daniel Inoyue, “…to be a consistent liberal in a reliably Democratic state. He supported a 2009 bill to legalize civil unions that was vetoed by then-Gov. Linda Lingle. In keeping with his work in saving beaches, he's also emphasized environmental concerns and served on energy- and environment-related committees in the Hawaii House.”

Looming over all of this is the fiscal cliff.  The Wall Street Journal's fiscal cliff graphics page makes an otherwise tiresome and complicated subject intelligible. (Also see the Nov. 30 LobbyBlog).

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